Ripple effects: New ‘waters of the U.S.’ rules still murky (click  to read more)

The Journal Record – ‎May 28, 2015
A decision about a controversial water pollution law may have ripple effects across the nation and in Oklahoma. Yet water law attorneys disagree about whether the new rules, published Wednesday, will improve or worsen water quality.

After over 5 years of elections, litigation, FERC licensing, and public process, PMKN was instrumental in the defeating the ill-conceived City of Aspen Castle Creek Hydroelectric Plant. See http://www.aspentimes.com/news/11947210-113/energy-rights-council-true

Aspen law firm to argue before US Supreme Court…

This April the Aspen-based law firm Patrick, Miller, Noto will join that exclusive group when it presents arguments to the Supreme Court in a water law case…

US Supreme Court to consider lawsuit involving Texas water district

The Republic. Tarrant Regional Water District filed a lawsuit in 2007 seeking to invalidate Oklahoma statutes that govern the appropriation and use of water within its boundaries and that North Texas communities say pose burdens to interstate commerce.

Supreme Court to Decide on Texans’ Bid for Oklahoma’s Water (click  to read more)

New York Times (blog)
A reservoir in southeastern Oklahoma in the Kiamichi River basin. Oklahoma officials have blocked the Jim Wilson/The New York Times A reservoir in southeastern Oklahoma in the Kiamichi River basin. Oklahoma officials have blocked the Tarrant County NY Times Blog.

US Supreme Court agrees to hear water case pitting Oklahoma against Texas – NewsOK.com (click to read more)

The administration asked the Supreme Court to take the case, as did the Tarrant Regional Water District. The state of Oklahoma urged the high court to reject the case, arguing that the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals properly decided that Texas has…

Law of the Dry Land: by Arthur Allen, ASLA Magazine, October 2012

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